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Urology

Therapeutic Areas All

Description of BLADDER PAIN/INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS measure:

Measures include:

  • Bladder Pain/Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Score (BPIC-SS)
BPIC-SS
The Bladder Pain/Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Score (BPIC-SS) is an 8-item measure, developed to identify an appropriate Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis (BPS/IC) population for clinical studies to evaluate new treatments for BPS. Other relevant information

Reference:

Humphrey L, Arbuckle R, Moldwin R, Nordling J, van de Merwe JP, Meunier J, Crook T, Abraham L. The Bladder Pain/Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Score: Development, Validation, and Identification of a Cut Score. European Urology 2012;61;271-279.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

BSW
The BSW consists of three, single-item, patient-rated, interviewer-administered, global assessments of treatment Benefit, Satisfaction with treatment, and Willingness to continue treatment. Other relevant information

Patient-reported constructs such as health-related quality of life and treatment satisfaction have been assessed using multi-item and single-item measures. Multi-item measures (such as the OAB-q) are a rich source of information regarding the many facets of patient's lives that are affected by a condition. However, single-item, global measures such as the BSW have the advantage of brevity, ease of administration, and ease of interpretation. Single-item measures may be useful in conditions with multiple and varied symptoms (e.g. OAB) and in circumstances where the construct is an evaluation based on personal criteria that are not well understood or that vary from patient to patient (e.g., overall satisfaction). The choice between single- and multi-item measures requires a careful consideration of these factors.

The BSW has demonstrated concurrent and discriminant validity in patients with OAB (Pleil et al. 2005). This instrument can facilitate physician efforts to gain an understanding of how patients value their treatment while providing a quick and convenient way to determine if there are treatment-related issues that require additional exploration.

Reference:

Pleil AM, Coyne KS, Reese PR, et al. The validation of patient-rated global assessments of treatment benefit, satisfaction, and willingness to continue--the BSW. Value Health. 2005;8 Suppl 1:S25-34.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

N-QOL
The Nocturia Quality of Life questionnaire is a 13-item, 5-point scale that asks patients to rate their subjective impression of the impact of "having to get up at night to urinate" on their quality of life. Other relevant information
This measure has been shown to have concurrent and discriminant validity [Abraham et al. 2004].

Reference:

Abraham L, Hareendran A, Mills IW, Martin ML, Abrams P, Drake MJ, MacDonagh RP, Noble JG. Development and validation of a quality-of-life measure for men with Nocturia. Urology 2004;63:481-486. ICS 2003: Nocturia Coyne KS, Zhou S. Nocturia has a significant impact on health related quality of life. Oral poster presentation at International Continence Society, October, 2003.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q LF 4 week recall)
The Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) was developed to assess symptom bother and the impact of overactive bladder (OAB) on health-related quality of life (HRQL). The instrument was developed and validated in both continent and incontinent OAB patients, including both men and women. Other relevant information

What are the features of the various versions of the OAB-q?

There are six questionnaires in the OAB-q family. The choice of the most appropriate instrument will depend upon the intended use of the questionnaire and the specific research objectives. When selecting the questionnaire for your study, it is important to remember that with an increased number of questions, increased sensitivity is gained in the questionnaire.
  • OAB-q LF 4-week recall:

    The original version of the OAB-q was developed to assess symptom bother and health-related quality of life (HRQL) among patients with either continent or incontinent overactive bladder.

  • The original OAB-q has an 8-item symptom bother scale and four HRQL subscales (coping, concern, sleep, social interaction), which are derived from 25 items.
  • The original OAB-q should be used when the research objectives relate to assessing symptom bother as a study endpoint or when assessing specific aspects of OAB's impact on HRQL such as effects on sleep or social interaction.
  • The original OAB-q has a recall period of 4 weeks, and it is usually self-administered in approximately 10 minutes.
  • Each item is rated on a six-point Likert scale
  • It was designed for use among individuals who are at least 18 years old.
  • OAB-q LF 1-week recall:

    This questionnaire is identical to the original OAB-q, but with a recall period of 1 week rather than 4 weeks.

  • OAB-q SF 4-week recall:

    A short form of the original OAB-q was derived to provide a "quick" assessment of symptom bother and global HRQL. This "short form," called the OAB-q SF, consists of a 6-item symptom bother scale and a 13-item HRQL scale. The OAB-q SF should be used when the assessment of symptom bother is desired, but when a global assessment of HRQL, rather than specific domains of HRQL, is desired. The OAB-q SF uses a 4 week recall period.

  • OAB-q SF 1-week recall:

    This questionnaire is identical to the original OAB-q SF, but with a recall period of 1 week rather than 4 weeks.

  • OAB Awareness Tool (OAB-V3):

    This is a shorter 3-item version of the OAB Awareness Tool (OAB-V8), designed to be used as a screener.

  • OAB Awareness Tool (OAB-V8):

    The 8-item Symptom Bother scale of the original OAB-q was validated for use as an awareness tool to identify patients who may have bothersome OAB symptoms. The OAB Awareness Tool was designed for use as a screener.

Development of the OAB-q

Given the high prevalence and substantial negative impact of OAB, reliable and well validated measures are needed to assess treatment outcomes on patients' quality of life. Because OAB is defined by symptoms, patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) are essential for complete assessment of these symptoms and their impact. Thus, the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) was developed in the following steps (Coyne et al. 2002):
  • Based on focus groups with male and female OAB patients as well as literature review, 66 initial items were generated for the OAB-q.
  • Content validity of these items was assessed through interviews with clinical experts and cognitive debriefing with OAB patients.
  • Through item and factor analysis, the initial pool of 66 items was reduced to the final 33-item questionnaire.

Psychometric Validation of OAB-q

The OAB-q has been validated in diverse clinical and community samples of over 2500 total participants, thereby capturing the range of mild to severe OAB symptoms and HRQL impact. Among both continent and incontinent OAB patients, the OAB-q has consistently demonstrated good internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, discriminant validity, and responsiveness to treatment-related change.

Reliability

The OAB-q has demonstrated high internal consistency reliability in both clinical and community samples, with Cronbach's α in various samples ranging from 0.86 to 0.93 for the symptom bother scale and 0.75 to 0.96 for the HRQL subscales (e.g., Coyne et al. 2002). The OAB-q has demonstrated good test-retest reliability (reproducibility) with intraclass correlation coefficients in the moderate to high range between assessments two weeks apart (all subscales = 0.83) (Matza et al. 2005).

Validity

The OAB-q has demonstrated criterion validity through statistically significant correlations with previously established patient-reported outcome measures (e.g., the SF-36) and clinical data. OAB-q subscales have been shown to discriminate among continent OAB patients, incontinent OAB patients, and controls without OAB. The OAB-q has also shown discriminant validity in that it distinguishes among patients with varying levels of urge intensity, micturition frequency, and frequency of nocturia episodes (Coyne et al. 2002; Coyne et al. 2003).

Responsiveness

Responsiveness to treatment-related change has been assessed using data from a large 12-week clinical trial. The OAB-q was highly responsive with subscale effect sizes ranging from 0.44 (social interaction) to 1.2 (symptom bother). A reduction of > 3 urgency episodes, > 3 micturitions, or > 1 incontinence episode per day resulted in significant score changes in all OAB-q subscales (p >0.05) Improvements in OAB-q scales were associated with changes in patient and physician perceptions of treatment benefit (Coyne et al. 2005). Responsiveness to change has also been demonstrated separately among continent and incontinent OAB patients (Coyne et al. 2007)

What differentiates the OAB-q from other condition-specific questionnaires such as the KHQ, IIQ, or I-QOL?

A range of well-validated condition-specific questionnaires are available for use among patients with symptoms of OAB. Questionnaires vary in terms of the domains assessed and the number of items assessing a specific domain. Depending upon the goals of the research or clinical question, one questionnaire may be preferable over another particularly if it assesses a desired domain that other questionnaires may or may not address adequately.

Another distinguishing feature of each questionnaire involves the specific patient population for which it was designed and validated. Instruments should have demonstrated evidence of reliability and validity in the patient population under investigation (Leidy et al. 1999). A questionnaire shown to be valid in one population is not necessarily valid for use in a population with different demographic or clinical characteristics. Therefore, when choosing an instrument, it is critical to match the questionnaire with the intended study sample. Please see the table below summarizing Condition-Specific Health-Related Quality of Life Instruments for further information on relevant questionnaires.

Name of Instrument Target Condition/Population Number of Items Recall Period Subscales Key Development/Validation Citations
CONTILIFE: A Quality of Life Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Women, SUI 28 Past 4 weeks (27 items), Current (1 item) Daily activities, Effort activities, Self-image, Emotional Consequences, Sexuality, Well-being, Global score Amarenco et al. 2003
Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ) Women, UI 30 Current Physical Activity, Travel, Social, Emotional Shumaker et al. 1994
Incontinence Impact Questionnaire - Revised (IIQ-R) Women, UI 30 Current Physical Activity, Travel, Social, Emotional, Embarrassment Vaart et al. 2003
Incontinence Impact Questionnaire - Short Form (IIQ-7) Women, UI 7 Current N/A Uebersax et al. 1995
Incontinence Quality of Life Questionnaire (I-QOL) UI 22 Today Avoidance and limiting behaviors, psychosocial, Social embarrassment Wagner et al. 1996
Incontinence Stress Questionnaire for Patients (ISQ-P) UI 20 Past 7 days Depressive, Aesthetic/Somatic, Social Yu et al. 1989
King s Health Questionnaire (KHQ) UI 21 Current Role Limitations, Physical Limitations, Social Limitations, Personal Limitations, Emotional Problems, Sleep/Energy Disturbance, Severity (Coping) Measures, Symptom Severity, Incontinence Impact (Single-item), General Health Perception (Single-item) Kelleher et al. 1997
Male Urinary Symptom Impact Questionnaire (MUSIQ) Men, UI 32 No recall period specified Activity, Social Contact, Emotional Health, Self-Confidence, Stability of Support, Sleep Robinson & Shea 2002
Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) Continent and incontinent OAB 33 Past 4 weeks Symptom Bother, Coping, Concern, Social Interaction, Sleep Coyne et al. 2002
Quality of Life Questionnaire for Urinary Urge Incontinence Women, UUI 24 No information available Activities, Emotional Impact, Self-Image, Sleep, Well-Being Marquis et al. 1995
Symptom Impact Index For Stress Incontinence in Women (SSI-SI) Women, SUI 3 Past year (3 items), ever (9 items), past week (1 item), currently (7 items) N/A Black et al. 1996
Urge Impact Scale (URIS) Older persons, UI 24 Past month Psychological Burden, Perception of Personal Control, Self-Concept DuBeau et al. 1999
Urge-Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (U-IIQ) MUI, UUI 32 Past 4 weeks Travel, Activities, Physical Activities, Feelings, Relationships, Sexual Function, Nighttime Bladder Control Lubeck et al. 1999
Urinary Incontinence Handicap Inventory (UIHI) Elderly women, UI due to detrusor instability 17 Past 4 weeks N/A Rai et al. 1994
Urinary Incontinence Severity Score (UISS) Women, UI 10 Current N/A Stach-Lempinen et al. 2001
York Incontinence Perceptions Scale (YIPS) Women, UI 8 Current N/A Lee et al. 1995
SUI: Stress Urinary Incontinence UUI: Urge Urinary Incontinence MUI: Mixed Urinary Incontinence (i.e., both stress and urge) UI: Urinary Incontinence (stress/urge not specified) OAB: Overactive Bladder This table is from the published article: Matza LS, Zyczynski ™, & Bavendam T. A review of quality of life questionnaires for urinary incontinence and overactive bladder: Which ones to use and why. Current Urology Reports (5):336-42, Oct 5, 2004.

What is the difference between the three questionnaires?

There are three questionnaires in the OAB-q family. The choice of the most appropriate instrument will depend upon the intended use of the questionnaire and the specific research objectives.
  • OAB-q:

    The original version of the OAB-q was developed to assess symptom bother and health-related quality of life (HRQL) among patients with either continent or incontinent overactive bladder. The original OAB-q has an 8-item symptom bother scale and four HRQL subscales (coping, concern, sleep, social interaction), which are derived from 25 items. The original OAB-q should be used when the research objectives relate to assessing symptom bother as a study endpoint or when assessing specific aspects of OAB's impact on HRQL are desired, such as effects on sleep, social interaction, and so on.

  • OAB-q SF:

    A short form of the original OAB-q was derived to provide a "quick" assessment of symptom bother and global HRQL. This "short form," called the OAB-q SF, consists of a 6-item symptom bother scale and a 13-item HRQL scale. The OAB-q SF should be used when the assessment of symptom bother is desired, but may not be a primary or secondary endpoint or when a global assessment of HRQL, rather than specific domains of HRQL, is desired.

  • OAB Awareness Tool:

    The 8-item Symptom Bother scale of the original OAB-q was validated for use as an awareness tool to identify patients who may have bothersome OAB symptoms. The format and instructions of the OAB Awareness Tool were designed for screener use.

When selecting the questionnaire for your study, it is important to remember that with an increased number of questions, increased sensitivity is gained in the questionnaire.

Published Articles that Examine, Use, or Discuss the OAB-q

Acquadro C, Kopp Z, Coyne KS, et al. Translating overactive bladder questionnaires in 14 languages. Urology. Mar 2006;67(3):536-540.

Capo JP, Jr., Laramee C, Lucente V, Fakhoury A, Forero-Schwanhaeuser S. Solifenacin treatment for overactive bladder in Hispanic patients: patient-reported symptom bother and quality of life outcomes from the VESIcare vOpen-Label Trial. Int J Clin Pract. Jan 2008;62(1):39-46.

Coyne KS, Elinoff V, Gordon DA, et al. Relationships between improvements in symptoms and patient assessments of bladder condition, symptom bother and health-related quality of life in patients with overactive bladder treated with tolterodine. Int J Clin Pract. Jun 2008a;62(6):925-931.

Coyne KS, Margolis MK, Thompson C, Kopp Z. Psychometric Equivalence of the OAB-q in Danish, German, Polish, Swedish, and Turkish. Value Health. May 16 2008b.

Coyne KS, Sexton CC, Irwin DE, et al. The impact of overactive bladder, incontinence and other lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life, work productivity, sexuality and emotional well-being in men and women: results from the EPIC study. BJU Int. Jun 2008c;101(11):1388-1395.

Coyne KS, Matza LS, Thompson C, Jumadilova Z, Bavendam T. The responsiveness of the OAB-q among OAB patient subgroups. Neurourol Urodyn. 2007;26(2):196-203.

Coyne KS, Matza LS, Thompson CL, Kopp ZS, Khullar V. Determining the importance of change in the overactive bladder questionnaire. J Urol. Aug 2006;176(2):627-632; discussion 632.

Coyne KS, Matza LS, Thompson CL. The responsiveness of the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q). Qual Life Res. Apr 2005;14(3):849-855.

Coyne KS, Payne C, Bhattacharyya SK, et al. The impact of urinary urgency and frequency on health-related quality of life in overactive bladder: results from a national community survey. Value Health. Jul-Aug 2004;7(4):455-463.

Coyne KS, Zhou Z, Bhattacharyya SK, et al. The prevalence of nocturia and its effect on health-related quality of life and sleep in a community sample in the USA. BJU Int. Dec 2003a;92(9):948-954.

Coyne KS, Zhou Z, Thompson C, Versi E. The impact on health-related quality of life of stress, urge and mixed urinary incontinence. BJU Int. Nov 2003b;92(7):731-735.

Coyne K, Revicki D, Hunt T, et al. Psychometric validation of an overactive bladder symptom and health-related quality of life questionnaire: the OAB-q. Qual Life Res. Sep 2002;11(6):563-574.

Garely AD, Lucente V, Vapnek J, Smith N. Solifenacin for overactive bladder with incontinence: symptom bother and health-related quality of life outcomes. Ann Pharmacother. Mar 2007;41(3):391-398.

Herschorn S, Heesakkers J, Castro-Diaz D, et al. Effects of tolterodine extended release on patient perception of bladder condition and overactive bladder symptoms. Curr Med Res Opin. Dec 2008;24(12):3513-3521.

Matza LS, Brewster-Jordan J, Zyczynski ™, Bavendam T. An updated review of quality-of-life questionnaires for urinary incontinence and overactive bladder: Which ones to use and why. Current Bladder Dysfunction Reports. 2006;1:71-80.

Matza LS, Thompson CL, Krasnow J, et al. Test-retest reliability of four questionnaires for patients with overactive bladder: the overactive bladder questionnaire (OAB-q), patient perception of bladder condition (PPBC), urgency questionnaire (UQ), and the primary OAB symptom questionnaire (POSQ). Neurourol Urodyn. 2005;24(3):215-225.

Yang Y, Brazier J, Tsuchiya A, Coyne K. Estimating a Preference-Based Single Index from the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire. Value Health. Jul 18 2008.

ISOQOL 2006: OAB-5D

Brazier JE, Tsuchiya A, Yang Y, Young TA, & Coyne K. Estimating a preference-based single index from the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire. Poster presented at the 13th Annual Conference of the International Society for Quality of Life Research; October 10-14, 2006; Lisbon, Portugal.

Reference:

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q LF 1-week recall)
The OAB-q LF with a 1-week recall period is identical to the original OAB-q, except for the shorter recall period. Other relevant information
Secondary analyses were performed on data for three 12-week clinical trials of fesoterodine to evaluate the psychometric characteristics and measurement properties of the OAB-q LF with a 1-week recall (Coyne et al. 2011). The OAB-q LF with 1 week recall appears to be psychometrically equivalent to the 4-week recall version of the OAB-q, but with slightly improved responsiveness.

Reference:

Coyne KS, Gelhorn H, Thompson C, Kopp ZS, & Guan Z. The psychometric validation of a 1-week recall period for the OAB-q. Int Urogynecol J. 2011 Dec;22(12):1555-63.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q SF 4-week recall)
The OAB-q Short Form (OAB-q SF) is a shortened version of the OAB-q that was derived from the original questionnaire through item response theory analyses. The OAB-q SF with a 1-week recall period is identical to the original OAB-q SF, except for a recall period of 1 week rather than 4 weeks. Other relevant information

The OAB-q SF was derived from the original OAB-q to reduce respondent burden while retaining the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the OAB-q. It has been validated retrospectively using data from a cross-sectional survey (n = 919) and a 12-week clinical trial (n = 865).

Rasch analysis (or Item Response Theory) was used to identify the questions or items within the original OAB-q that perform best across the spectrum of OAB symptoms. Items that worked well among patients with mild symptoms as well as severe symptoms were retained. Factor structure of the short form was examined using confirmatory factor analysis.

The 8-item symptom bother scale of the OAB-q was reduced to 6 items, and the 25-item HRQL scale of the OAB-q was reduced to 13 items.

The OAB-q SF demonstrated good internal consistency reliability, concurrent validity, discriminant validity, and responsiveness. These results have been presented at the 2004 Joint Meeting of the International Continence Society and the International UroGynecological Association (IUGA).

Reliability and Responsiveness of the OAB-q and OAB-q SF

# of items Cronbach's α Effect Size
Subscale OAB-q OAB-q SF OAB-q OAB-q SF OAB-q OAB-q SF
Symptom bother 8 6 0.93 0.91 -1.23 -1.14
HRQL 25 13 0.97 0.95 0.97 0.99

The OAB-q SF captures the full spectrum of OAB symptom bother and HRQL impact with good reliability, validity, and responsiveness, while being less time-consuming for patients to complete.

The OAB-q SF will be incorporated into the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) as the "ICIQ-OAB."

Reference:

ICS 2004: Short Form

Coyne KS, Lai JS, Zyczynski T, Kopp Z, Avery K, Abrams P. An overactive bladder symptom and quality-of-life short form: development of the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q) short form (SF). Presented at the Joint Meeting of the International Continence Society and the International Urogynecological Association; August 23-27, 2004; Paris, France.

Click here for a PDF of the presentation.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-q SF 1-week recall)
The OAB-q Short Form (OAB-q SF) is a shortened version of the OAB-q that was derived from the original questionnaire through item response theory analyses. The OAB-q SF with a 1-week recall period is identical to the original OAB-q SF, except for a recall period of 1 week rather than 4 week

Reference:

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

OAB Awareness Tool (OAB-V3)
The 3-item OAB Awareness Tool (OAB-V3) is designed to assist patients in identifying if they have bothersome overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. Other relevant information
The OAB Awareness Tool (OAB-V3) has been found to identify patients with symptoms of OAB with high sensitivity and specificity, and it can be used as a screener (Coyne et al. 2011). The measure asks patients how bothered they have been by the following: (1) frequent urination during the daytime hours; (2) a sudden urge to urinate with little or no warning; and (3) urine loss associated with a strong desire to urinate. Response options for each item are on a 6-point Likert scale ranging from 0 (not at all) to 5 (a very great deal) that are summed for a total score. The OAB-V3 is gender neutral.

Reference:

Coyne KS, Margolis MK, Bavendam T, Roberts R, & Elinoff V. Validation of a 3-item OAB awareness tool. Int J Clin Pract. 2011 Feb;65(2):219-24.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

OAB Awareness Tool (OAB-V8)
The 8-item symptom bother scale of the original OAB-q has been validated as an awareness tool to assist patients and physicians in primary care settings. Other relevant information

The 8-item symptom bother scale of the OAB-q has been evaluated as a screening tool for use in a primary care setting to identify patients who may have OAB. This study was conducted among 1260 patients from a primary care setting. Patients with a positive screener score were 95.7 times more likely than other patients to be diagnosed with Probable OAB.

The screening scores among the three diagnostic groups identified by clinicians (i.e., no OAB, possible OAB, probable OAB) were significantly different from each other.

This brief, simple tool can be used to screen for OAB in the primary care setting and raise awareness of OAB among primary care physicians and patients.

Reference:

Coyne KS, Zyczynski T, Margolis MK, Elinoff V, Roberts R. Validation of an overactive bladder awareness tool for use in primary care settings. Advances in Therapy. July/August 2005;22(4):381-394.

ICS 2004: Awareness Tool

Coyne KS, Margolis MK, Zyczynski T, Elinoff V, Roberts R. Validation of an OAB screener in a primary care patient population in the US. Presented at the Joint Meeting of the International Continence Society and the International Urogynecological Association; August 23-27, 2004; Paris, France.

Click here for a PDF of the presentation.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

Overactive Bladder Family Impact Measure (OAB-FIM)
The Overactive Bladder Family Impact Measure (OAB-FIM) is the first validated instrument designed to assess the impact of OAB on family members' quality of life (Coyne et al. 2009). This 19-item questionnaire has four subscales (Irritation, Activities, Travel, Concern) intended for use among all family members as well as two additional subscales (Sleep, Sex) for use only by spouses/significant others of OAB patients. Other relevant information
In a validation study conducted with dyads of OAB patients and their family members, the OAB-FIM demonstrated good internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity. In addition, the questionnaire discriminated between family members of OAB patients and control family members. Results of this study suggested that OAB has an impact on family members, and the OAB-FIM is a useful instrument for assessing this impact.

Reference:

Coyne KS, Matza LS, Brewster-Jordan J, Thompson C, Bavendam T. The psychometric validation of the OAB family impact measure (OAB-FIM). Neurourol Urodyn. Mar 2010;29(3):359-369.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

OAB-S
The Overactive Bladder Satisfaction questionnaire is a valid, comprehensive instrument to assess satisfaction with treatment of OAB based on independent scales that have demonstrated satisfactory psychometric performance. Other relevant information
The OAB-S is a patient-completed questionnaire including five scales: OAB Control Expectations (ten items); Impact on Daily Living with OAB (ten items); OAB Control (ten items); OAB Medication Tolerability (six items); and Satisfaction with Control (ten items) and five single-item overall assessments of patient’s fulfillment of OAB medication expectations, interruption of day-to-day life due to OAB, overall satisfaction with OAB medication; willingness to continue OAB medication and improvement in day-to-day life due to OAB medication.

Reference:

Piault E, Evans CJ, Espindle D, Kopp Z, Brubaker L, Abrams P. Development and validation of the Overactive Bladder Satisfaction questionnaire. Neurourol Urodyn. 2008;27(3):179-90.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

PPBC
The Patient Perception of Bladder Condition is a single-item, 6-point scale that asks patients to rate their subjective impression of their current bladder problems. Other relevant information
This measure has been shown to have concurrent and discriminant validity as well as responsiveness to treatment [Coyne et al 2006].

Reference:

Herschorn S, Heesakkers J, Castro-Diaz D, Wang JT, Brodsky M, Guan Z. Effects of tolterodine extended release on patient perception of bladder condition and overactive bladder symptoms. Curr Med Res Opin. 2008;24(12):3513-3521.

Coyne KS, Matza LS, Kopp Z, Abrams P. The validation of the patient perception of bladder condition (PPBC): a single-item global measure for patients with overactive bladder. Eur Urol. 2006;49(6):1079-1086

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

SAGA
The Self-Assessment Goal Achievement (SAGA) questionnaire is a communication tool designed to help patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and their healthcare providers adopt reasonable treatment expectations and assess goal achievement. SAGA consists of a baseline (goal-assessment) module which helps facilitate patient-clinician communication and set realistic treatment expectations, and a follow-up (goal-achievement) module which assesses the extent to which goals were achieved after treatment. SAGA is the first questionnaire to capture individualized treatment expectations and goals regarding LUTS. Other relevant information
  • Developed for administration as a paper-and-pencil questionnaire
  • Designed for use in adult patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)

BASELINE SAGA module:

Asks patients to rate the importance of 9 prespecified (fixed) treatment goals that describe reducing the following LUTS: frequency (daytime and nighttime); sensation of pressure; primary sensation to use the bathroom; bladder voiding; starting or maintaining a urine stream; urine loss when coughing, laughing, exercising, or sneezing; urine leakage; and urgency. In addition to the 9 fixed goals, patients can list up to 5 additional (open) treatment goals. Patients rate the importance of each goal using a 5-point scale ranging from “not very important goal” to “very important goal.”

FOLLOW-UP SAGA module:

Patients rate their achievement of each individualized goal and overall goal achievement with a 5-point scale ranging from “did not achieve goal” to “greatly exceeded goal.”

Reference:

Brubaker L, Piault EC, Tully E, Evans CJ, Bavendam T, Beach J, et al. Validation Study of the Self-Assessment Goal Achievement (SAGA) Questionnaire for lower urinary tract Ssmptoms. April 2013; 67(4): 342-350.

Description of OVERACTIVE BLADDER measure:

Measures include:

For additional information on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Urology please visit www.iciq.net*

* Developed by the International Consultation on Incontinence questionnaire committee

UPS
The Urgency Perception Scale is a single-item, three-response measure of perceived urinary urgency. The UPS has been both self- and interviewer-administered among patients with symptoms of OAB. The patient is asked to describe his/her typical experience when he/she feels the desire to urinate. Other relevant information
The UPS was developed to assess perceived urinary urgency in clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of the antimuscarinic drug, tolterodine, for treating overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome.

Reference:

Cardozo L, Coyne KS, Versi E. Validation of the Urgency Perception Scale. BJU Int. 2005;95:591-596.